I Am Graduating From PT School: How Do I Build an Awesome Resume? And What The Deuce Is a CV?

You’re about to graduate from physical therapy school.  First of all, you’re awesome.  The problem is, so are almost all of the ten thousand other physical therapy school graduates this year.

“But,” you’re thinking, “I really AM awesome.”  I believe you.  Next step: get your ideal employer to believe you by having an awesome resume.

Start by checking out 5 Resume Tips for PTs and PTAs (Who Don’t Want the Job).  Don’t be fooled by the title – you’ll be glad you read it.

Next, read on and get the answer to your question: what the deuce is a CV?

It stands for Curriculum Vitae, which is Latin for “the course of my life.”  Or 21st century for “what have you been doing professionally since you graduated.”

One of the big things that makes a CV different from a resume is the extra stuff you find on a CV.  Things like:

  • Continuing education courses and conferences you’ve attended
  • Professional presentations you have given (i.e., inservices, continuing education)
  • Papers or articles that you have had published
  • Community service, academic service (for faculty), and awards

You have probably heard that when writing a resume, you shouldn’t try to put everything you’ve ever done in it – especially if it isn’t related to the job you are applying for.  The CV is different.  It really is supposed to be a detailed record of your career.

And since the CV is telling this detailed story of your professional life, things are usually listed in chronological order.  Resumes are usually the opposite.

What I like to do is put ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING I’ve done on my CV.  It’s a great record of my career.  Then, when I need to apply for a job, or submit my CV for any other reason, I just “save as” a new file and delete all the details I don’t need, and I have custom CV or resume every time.

So, should you submit a resume or a CV if you are trying to get your first job in physical therapy?  Most likely the resume.  Unless you did a lot of stuff in the list above, you probably won’t have any of the stuff that goes on a CV anyway.  The other thing to consider is that CVs are usually used in academics, and resumes are used virtually everywhere else.  Every time you apply for a clinical PT position, you should probably submit a resume.  If you ever apply to teach in a physical therapy program, submit a CV.

Good luck in your job search.  Leave a comment below and let us know how it went!

And when you get that awesome job, and want to know how to negotiate a great salary, check out our series:

The Right Tools for Negotiating Your Salary: Part One – Your Value

The Right Tools for Negotiating Your Salary: Part Two – The Market

The Right Tools for Negotiating Your Salary: Part Three – The Negotiation

And make sure you follow us on Twitter or Facebook for the latest.

© 2013 The PT Student.  All rights reserved.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Professional and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to I Am Graduating From PT School: How Do I Build an Awesome Resume? And What The Deuce Is a CV?

  1. Pingback: 5 Resume Tips for PTs and PTAs (who DON’T want the job) | The PT Student

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s